Dogs Dig Walking

Summertime safety when out & about

Enjoying the outdoors with your dog is wonderful any time of year, provided you keep an eye out for hazards that can turn a fun excursion into an emergency for your dog.
>> Read more


Let the games begin

Youngsters of most species like to play. But in most species, play behavior dwindles with adulthood. Not so when it comes to humans and dogs: Animals who play together stay together!
>> Read more


Wilderness trips with your dog

In a country that holds vast expanses of natural beauty, there’s always a new wilderness to explore, and canine company only makes the great outdoors better. But if you’re planning an adventure in the wilds with your dog, be sure to prepare.
>> Read more


Treat-ing your dog right

Treats are an essential part of doggie life, great for training sessions and for building a positive reaction to new or scary things. Treats don’t have to undermine your dog’s healthy diet—not if you follow some straightforward guidelines.
>> Read more


Dog in the spotlight:
Newfoundland (Newfie)

Newfies range from huge to mammoth (the heaviest Newfie on record clocked the scale at 260lbs), and size, with all its implications, is part and parcel of life with these big hunks’o’love. Like most giant breeds, they eat lots, nap often, and take up considerable space. But far from being couch potatoes, Newfies are strong working dogs with extraordinary lung capacity and swim-stroke propulsion, plus a waterproof coat that protects them in icy water. Perfectly equipped for lifesaving feats in water, Newfies crowd the history books with acts of courage in aid of humans. They are known for gentle dispositions, patience, and a nurturing streak that inspired Nana, the dog nanny in Peter Pan. Newfie art includes famous works in every medium from paint to bronze. Famous owners include poets (Emily Dickinson), presidents (Ulysses S. Grant), and musicians (Richard Wagner).

To re-home a Newfie, visit your local shelter or rescue group.


Nail trimming tips

If you can, arrange to have a veterinarian, vet tech, or groomer show you how to trim your dog’s nails: it’s much easier to replicate if you see it done first. Also keep in mind that some dogs wear down their nails naturally and don’t need pedicures. If that’s not your dog, here are some tips:

The prep. Have delicious treats on hand to dish out with every snip of the trimmers. If your dog has already had a bad experience or is nervous, go slow. Better to get less done but have a good experience that builds a lifetime of easy nail trimming.

The strategy. Aim to cut a little bit at a time to make sure you don’t hit the painful pink part. Cut conservatively first and then use a nail file from there.

The trimming. Hold your dog’s paw and gently push out a nail. Avoid the pink (live) part of the nail. When you cut, be quick, smooth, and decisive. After each snip, give your dog a yummy treat.

Going on vacation?

Summer is busy, so give your pets a vacation too!
  • Vacation visits. Between 1-3 daily visits to care for your pets when you're out of town.
  • Overnight pet sitting. We stay at your house overnight and keep your pets happy!
>> Learn more

New DDW dogs!

Welcome the following new friends to the DDW family:
Roxy Rufus

These doggie
hearing facts?

High frequency. Dogs can hear significantly higher frequency sounds than humans (although cats take the prize in that department). In the dead of night, for example, dogs can hear the high-frequency crystal resonator inside your digital alarm clock.

Superior muscle control. Our ears can barely twitch. Dog ears move independently of each other and are operated by 18 muscles that allow them to tilt, rotate, and stand straight up.

Shaped for sound. Unlike our super-short ear canals, dogs have long, L-shaped ear canals. This makes a dog ear an instrument finely tuned to interpret sound, but makes it difficult to clean and as such prone to infections and parasites.

You are receiving this email because you subscribed to Dogs Dig Walking's dig this enewsletter.

Subscribe here

Unsubscribe here